The politics of PVC: Technology and institutions in upland water management in northern Thailand

An article exploring the politics, technology and institutions involved in northern Thailand’s upland water management. Conflict over water has grown in the mountainous areas of Thailand since the replacement of opium with alternative crops. PVC‐sprinkler irrigation has enabled dry‐season expansion of these cash crops on sloping lands, intensifying demand for water when it is most scarce. Common conceptions of upstream – downstream conflict, pitting Thai against ethnic minorities in a struggle for resources, dominate the discourse of watersheds in Thailand. Understanding how upland communities create local systems of resource governance through dry‐season irrigation is highly relevant for governance at higher levels, such as in the efforts to establish watershed networks and river basin organisations.

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Additional Info

Field Value
Document type Reports, journal articles, and research papers (including theses and dissertations)
Language of document
  • English
Topics
  • Agriculture
  • Crop products and commodities
  • Irrigation and water management
  • Water and sanitation infrastructure and facilities
  • Water resources
Geographic area (spatial range)
  • Thailand
Copyright Unclear copyright
Access and use constraints

Water Alternatives distributes under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License 3.0. http://www.water-alternatives.org/index.php/submission

Version / Edition 1.0
License CC-BY-4.0
Contact

Nathan Badenoch baideanach@gmail.com

Author (individual) Badenoch, Nathan
Publication date 2009
General note

Water Alternatives Volume 2, Issue 2, 269‐288

Date uploaded June 2, 2015, 08:16 (UTC)
Date modified June 21, 2016, 08:00 (UTC)